On Being Fat, Brown, Femme, Ugly, and Unloveable

http://www.blackgirldangerous.org/2014/07/fat-brown-femme-ugly-unloveable/

Romantic love, as we understand it, is a colonial construct. It is an all-consuming, possessive, lifelong, monogamous endeavor that works to sustain capitalism and white supremacist heteropatriarchy via the nuclear family. We are told that this romantic love is essential, shaping it as a self-fulfilling prophecy. Were we to sustain ourselves on self-love, platonic love, and love of community, what could change? We could see the beauty of our interdependence, rather than individuals competing for higher wages and standards of living at the expense of each other. The formation of families, rather than communities, creates hierarchies of which people are worthy and deserving of our attention, protection and devotion. With a restructuring of romantic love as comparable to community/platonic/self-love, we begin to prioritize the care and livelihood of entire larger groups of people as equally important as our romantic partner/s.

The Clippers are a strange organization

Who is running shit over there? Sterling is suing his wife because he’s a racist moneybags. Doc Rivers is not being sexist and giving this woman a chance she deserves based on merit. I don’t get it.

CLIPPERS’ NAKASE BREAKING BARRIERS

http://www.nba.com/clippers/natalie-nakase-breaking-barriers

Nakase, the Clippers’ assistant video coordinator, is trying to earn credibility in the coaching profession the same way: by proving her worth. She landed a spot as an assistant coach on the Clippers’ bench during the two-week N.B.A. Summer League here, a first according to the Clippers and a step toward her goal of becoming an N.B.A. coach — something no woman has ever accomplished.

Our Enemies In Blue by Kristian Williams

Freeway incident raises questions on how police interact with public

“In my experience with videos, they’re not the whole story,” Meyer said. “Everyone would agree that just viewing someone punching someone else is not a pretty thing to see. But we need to figure out what happened. Why did it happen? And was it legally justified?”

This is the mindset of a psychopath.

I choke two dudes before I choke two dudes…

Here are some other recent incidents of police brutality:

• In Lansing, Michigan, a cop pushes a wheelchair-bound man over onto the sidewalk, then places him under arrest after his foot was merely rolled over.
• In Tuscon, Arizona, a cop shoves an unsuspecting woman to the ground.
• In Phoenix, a cop tackles an ASU professor for jaywalking and not handing over her ID.
• In Los Angeles, a California Highway Patrol cop beats a grandmother on the shoulder of a highway.
• In Tampa, a SWAT raid leaves an alleged marijuana dealer dead. Police find less than a gram in the house.
• In Westbury, New York, a cop assaults a 20-year-old man for no apparent reason.

Cops Choke and Bloody Marijuana Suspect in San Antonio

San Antonio Officer Michael Ramirez applies choke hold.

There’s a teenaged pot smoker in San Antonio, Texas who’s luckier than he might imagine. Put into a non-sanctioned choke hold during his arrest by a local police officer, he’s still alive today to tell his story. Many other police brutality incidents around the U.S. result in serious injury or even death.

San Antonio Park Police Officer Michael Ramirez allegedly saw the unnamed 16-year-old smoking a joint at 500 W. Market St. on May 4. Claiming the suspect initially tried to run, Ramirez placed him in a choke hold for over two minutes, caught on ideo video by an unidentified Facebook user, who posted it.

http://www.celebstoner.com/blogs/preston-peet/2014/07/07/cops-choke-and-bloody-marijuana-suspect-in-san-antonio/

Are you askin’ to me?

Asking For Trouble: Albuquerque Police Repeatedly Accused of Excessive Force Buying Hundreds of Assault Rifles To Solve Problem

by Abby Zimet

Albuquerque police, sometimes dubbed the worst in the country among many over-militarized police departments for its long record of well-armed abuses, have come up with an innovative response to a DOJ investigation finding officers using their own personal assault rifles as “status symbols” have contributed to a “pattern and practice” of excessive force: Now, the police will buy them their assault rifles. The APD – which has paid $24 million in legal settlements to shooting victims’ families (but never prosecuted a cop), long indulged in the practice of shooting at moving vehicles to slow them down, and recently faced widespread protests and a “people’s trial” of their police chief after the killing of a homeless man – says it is buying 350 AR-15 assault rifles, the civilian version of the military-grade M16  used to kill that same homeless man, for $350,000 in order to replace on the taxpayers’ dime the officers’ own weapons they were consistenly abusing, because “that training shouldn’t go to waste.” So now, all good. Walter White, come home.

“We found that police overwhelmingly use SWAT raids not for extreme emergencies like hostage situations but to carry out such basic police work as serving warrants or searching for a small amount of drugs,” said Kara Dansky, Senior Counsel with the ACLU’s Center for Justice. “Carried out by ten or more officers armed with assault rifles, flashbang grenades, and battering rams, these paramilitary raids disproportionately impacted people of color, sending the clear message that the families being raided are the enemy. This unnecessary violence causes property damage, injury, and death.”

·          APD officers too frequently use deadly force against people who pose a minimal threat and in situations where the conduct of the officers heightens the danger and contributes to the need to use force;

·          APD officers use less lethal force, including electronic controlled weapons, on people who are passively resisting, non-threatening, observably unable to comply with orders or pose only a minimal threat to the officers; and

·          Encounters between APD officers and persons with mental illness and in crisis too frequently result in a use of force or a higher level of force than necessary.

notes on wreckage to the pysche

photo(6)

I like this as a guide to talking to my dad and other loved ones about privilege and seeing things outside their point of view. and also good for me to remember to allow people space to testify to their individual experience. That takes patience and I wonder how that looks depending on the person and the place. The most interesting phrase has to be “repetitive statistical patterns”. I’m assuming that’s a re-wording of institutionalized oppression. Just much more mundane sounding. And referencing patterns like infant mortality rates, school to prison pipeline and rape jokes. It reminds of when a friend said to another friend, “did you just say benign colonialism?”.

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2014/05/the-woman-who-coined-the-term-white-privilege.html

Know Police Know Brutality

This isn’t really helping. I need some chips.

http://blog.angryasianman.com/2014/01/things-get-bloody-when-cops-arrest-84.html

1.20.2014

Things get bloody when cops arrest 84-year-old jaywalker

 NYPD gets tough — waaaaaay too tough — on jaywalking

Disturbing news out of New York City… Over the weekend, an elderly man was hospitalized after being left bloody and violently arrested by police on the Upper West Side. His crime? Jaywalking, apparently.

Cops leave elderly man a bloody mess after he jaywalked

Early Sunday morning, a 26-year-old woman died after being hit by a car on the far west end of 96th Street — the third pedestrian fatality to happen on the block in eight days. By that afternoon, NYPD officers were out in full force in the area, aggressively handing out tickets to jaywalkers in an effort to discourage unsafe street crossing. In the case 84-year-old jaywalker Kang Chun Wong, the cops got waaaay too aggressive.

According to the New York Post, the trouble began when cops spotted Wong crossing against the light at the intersection of 96th Street and Broadway, and attempted to give him a ticket. There appears to have been a language barrier, and when Wong started to walk away, the situation quickly devolved into what became a bloody mess:

“The guy didn’t seem to speak English. The cop walked him over to the Citibank” near the northeast corner of 96th and Broadway, said witness Ian King, a 24-year-old Fordham law student.

“He [the officer] stood him up against the wall and was trying to write him a ticket. The man didn’t seem to understand, and he started walking away.”

That’s when the officer and several colleagues converged on the senior citizen, who was left badly beaten and bloodied.

“The cop tried to pull him back and that’s when he [the pedestrian] began to struggle with the cop,” King said.

“As soon as he pushed the cop, it was like cops started running in from everywhere.”

I don’t care what the hell happened. There’s very little excuse for roughing up an elderly man. If you’re handing out jaywalking tickets to make a point about pedestrians putting themselves in harm’s way, I can tell you about one guy who was definitely harmed on Sunday afternoon. The 84-year-old guy who was knocked to the ground, handcuffed and hospitalized for a head wound.

Wong was charged with obstruction of government administration, disorderly conduct and resisting arrest.